Press Releases

Woodrow Wilson School Welcomes Ten New Faculty, Promotes Three

Jul 7, 2017
By:
Gillian Samios
Source:
Woodrow Wilson School

Ten new faculty members will be joining Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs this year, and three existing Wilson School faculty members have received promotions. The Wilson School will also welcome two distinguished visitors, Ambassador Ryan Crocker and Salam Fayyad, and has granted two faculty members emeritus status.

New Faculty

All appointments are effective July 1, 2017, unless otherwise noted.

Professors

Jennifer Jennings ’00 is professor of sociology and public affairs. Before joining the Wilson School, Jennings was an associate professor of sociology at New York University and postdoctoral fellow at Harvard. She received her Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University, M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge and A.B. from Princeton. Jennings’s research examines the racial, socioeconomic and gender disparities in health and education outcomes.

Henrik Kleven is professor of economics and public affairs. Before joining the Wilson School, Kleven was professor of economics at the London School of Economics and editor of the Journal of Public Economics. Kleven was previously a faculty member at the University of Copenhagen, where he received his Ph.D. His research combines empirical evidence and economic theory to design effective policies.

Pietro Ortoleva is professor of economics and public affairs. Before joining the Wilson School, Ortoleva was associate professor of economics at Columbia University. He received his Ph.D. in economics from New York University and B.A. in economics from Università di Torino. Ortoleva’s research explores behavioral science, microeconomics and political economy.

Assistant Professors and Instructors

Andrew Guess is assistant professor of politics and public affairs. Before joining the Wilson School, Guess was a postdoctoral fellow in data science at New York University’s Social Media and Political Participation Lab. Guess received his Ph.D, M.Phil and M.A. from Columbia University. He specializes in political communication, public opinion and political behavior.

Gregor Jarosch is assistant professor of economics and public affairs. Before joining the Wilson School, Jarosch was an assistant professor at Stanford University’s department of economics. He completed his postdoctoral fellowship at Princeton and was granted his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. Jarosch’s research interests lie in macroeconomics and labor.

Adam Kapor is assistant professor of economics and public affairs. Before joining the Wilson School, Kapor was assistant professor of economics at Columbia University. Kapor received his Ph.D. from Yale. His research explores industrial organization and the economics of education.

Jonathan Mayer ’09 is assistant professor of computer science and public affairs. He is a Ph.D. candidate in computer science at Stanford University, where he received his J.D. in 2013 and served as a fellow at Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation. His research lies at the intersection of information technology, public policy and law. (Mayer will join the School in the spring 2018 semester).

Jonathan Mummolo is assistant professor of politics and public affairs. Before joining the Wilson School, Mummolo was a teaching/research assistant at Stanford University. He received a Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University. Mummolo specializes in bureaucratic politics and political behavior.

David Silver is assistant professor in economics and public affairs. He joins the faculty this summer after having served as a postdoctoral fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. A Ph.D. graduate from the University of California, Berkeley, Silver specializes in health economics.

Maria Micaela (Mica) Sviatschi is instructor of economics and public affairs. Sviatschi is a Ph.D. candidate in economics at Columbia University and received her Master in Economics from Universidad de San Andres. Her interests lie in labor and development economics with a focus on crime, gender and political economy.

Promotions

Oleg Itskhoki was promoted to professor of economics and international affairs. He is a Sloan Research fellow and is an affiliated faculty member with the Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy & Finance. Itskhoki specializes in macroeconomics and international economics, currently studying the issue of optimal macroeconomic policies in economies with financial frictions. In 2012, he received the Excellence Award in Global Economic Affairs from the Kiel Institute for the World Economy.

Benjamin Moll was promoted to associate professor of economics and international affairs. Moll serves as the Cyril E. Black University Preceptor at Princeton and is an affiliated faculty member with the Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy & Finance. His research lies in microeconomics and development economics, and he is currently studying the role of income and wealth distribution in the macro-economy.

Markus Prior was promoted to professor of politics and public affairs. His book, "Post-Broadcast Democracy," won the 2009 Goldsmith Prize awarded by Harvard’s Joan Shorenstein Center and the 2010 Doris Graber Award for the "best book on political communication in the last 10 years" given by APSA's Political Communication Section.

Emeritus Status

Anne Case is the Alexander Stewart 1886 Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Emeritus and lecturer with rank of professor in public and international affairs. She has worked at Princeton since 1991 and studies labor economics, health economics and development studies. Case’s recent work with Nobel Laureate Sir Angus Deaton focuses on the rising morbidity and mortality rates among white non-Hispanic middle-aged Americans. She is the director of the Research Program in Development Studies at the Wilson School.

Robert Keohane is professor of public and international affairs, emeritus. He is the author of "After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy" (1984) and "Power and Governance in a Partially Globalized World" (2002). He has also served as the editor of the journal Joint Organization and as president of the International Studies Association and the American Political Science Association.

Distinguished Visitors

Ambassador Ryan Crocker, MCF ’85, will be joining WWS as Diplomat-in-Residence for 2017-18. He served as former dean of the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University and was a former U.S. ambassador to six countries. He has received the honor of Career Ambassador, the highest honor in the foreign service, among other awards.

Salam Fayyad will be joining WWS as the Daniella Lipper Coules ’95 Distinguished Visitor in Foreign Affairs. He is former prime minister of the Palestinian Authority. Fayyad worked at the International Monetary Fund from 1987-2001, where he was resident representative in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. He was named minister of finance of the Palestinian Authority in 2002 before serving as prime minister (2007-20013). In 2010, Fayyad was named one of TIME magazine’s top 100 most influential people in the world.