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Center for Health and Wellbeing Announces U.S. and Global Health Scholars

Feb 19, 2014
By:
Kristina Graff
Source:
Center for Health and Wellbeing

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PRINCETON, N.J.—The Center for Health and Wellbeing (CHW) at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs has selected three U.S. Health Policy Scholars and five Global Health Scholars. The scholars, all juniors, will receive financial support for travel and research to pursue internships and senior thesis research that relates to domestic and international health care and health policy.

As many as eight juniors are selected each year for the program through a rigorous application and selection process that focuses on the student's academic performance and his or her plans to research health policy issues.

The scholars are supported by the program through their junior and senior years. Scholars receive financial support to engage in health-related internships or independent research on health-related topics in the summer before their senior years and are expected to write senior theses with health-policy dimensions.

The scholars also may participate in planning health policy seminars and lectures, and they have the opportunity to interact with distinguished speakers during the speakers' campus visits.

The three 2014 U.S. Health Policy Scholars are:

  • Sasha Lieberman ’15, a psychology major. She will explore stigma related to HIV/AIDS and how it influences treatment adherence and prevention efforts.
  • Pavithra Viyayakumar ’15, a Woodrow Wilson School major pursuing a Certificate in Global Health and Health Policy. She will conduct field research on the impact of the Affordable Care Act on low-income patients in medically underserved areas of New York City.
  • Fred Shaykis ’15, a psychology major pursuing a Certificate in Global Health and Health Policy. He will investigate and test an educational intervention to improve nutrition and nutritional literacy in a Trenton school.

The five 2014 Global Health Scholars are:

  • Laura Cooper ’15, an ecology and evolutionary biology major pursuing a Certificate in Global Health and Health Policy. She will study the ecological and environmental dynamics of infectious disease in Kenya with a focus on malaria.
  • Lindsay Eysenbach ’15, a Woodrow Wilson School major pursuing a Certificate in Global Health and Health Policy. She will examine vaccination programs and their effects on health using Ghana as a case study.
  • Charles Fortin ’15, an East Asian studies major pursuing a Certificate in Global Health and Health Policy. He will conduct research in China on the tradition of incorporating health practices into daily life, along with the influence of these practices and ideas.
  • Emma Glennon ’15, an ecology and evolutionary biology major pursuing a Certificate in Global Health and Health Policy. She will travel to South Asia to investigate the effects of seasonal flooding in Bangladesh on the transmission of cholera.
  • Michael Kochis ’15, a molecular biology major pursuing a Certificate in Global Health and Health Policy. He will study viral diarrhea in Ghana, measuring rotavirus serotypes – a common cause of severe diarrhea in children – and how they relate to country’s vaccination program.

This initiative is part of the Center for Health and Wellbeing’s Global Health Program and its Program on U.S. Health Policy. The program’s key elements all relate to domestic and international health care and health policy, and include: seed grants to support innovative faculty research; conferences, workshops and policy forums; and graduate and undergraduate research/internship grants.

The U.S. Health Policy Scholars Program is a joint effort of Princeton's Keller Center and the Woodrow Wilson School's Center for Health and Wellbeing. The program is funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

The Center for Health and Wellbeing is an interdisciplinary center within the Woodrow Wilson School, which seeks to foster research and teaching on the multiple aspects of health and wellbeing in both developed and developing countries. 

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