WWS Calendar

Post-Mid Term Elections Panel to Feature NPR's David Welna, November 15

Nov 15, 2010 (All day)
Audience: 
Open to the Public

The Woodrow Wilson School will host a post mid-term elections panel discussion titled, "A Midcourse Correction? The 2010 Elections in Perspective," at 4:30 p.m. on Monday, November 15, in Bowl 016, Robertson Hall. A public reception will follow the discussion in the Bernstein gallery.

Panelists will include Brandice Canes-Wrone, a Professor of Politics and Public Affairs and Faculty Chair of the Undergraduate Program at the Woodrow Wilson School; Nolan McCarty, Associate Dean of the Woodrow Wilson School and the Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs; Steve Rogers, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Politics at Princeton University; and David Welna, Congressional Correspondent, Washington Desk for National Public Radio (NPR). Larry Bartels, the Donald E. Stokes Professor in Public and International Affairs, Director of the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics at the Woodrow Wilson School, will moderate the panel.

Larry Bartels’ primary interests are in electoral politics, public opinion, and the mass media. His first book, Presidential Primaries and the Dynamics of Public Choice, won the American Political Science Association’s Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award for the year’s best book on government, politics, or international affairs. His most recent book Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age (Princeton University Press, Russell Sage Foundation, 2008), analyzes the political causes and consequences of America's growing income gap.

Brandice Canes-Wrone's research interests include elections, political economy, and the US presidency. She is the author of numerous articles in the leading journals of political science and the award-winning book Who Leads Whom? Presidents, Policy, and the Public (University of Chicago Press 2006). Her papers on congressional elections include "Out of Step, Out of Office: Electoral Accountability and House Members' Voting" and "Issue Accountability and the Mass Public." Currently she has projects on the impact of electoral cycles on the economy, judicial elections, and congressional elections. She is also Faculty Chair of the Woodrow Wilson School undergraduate program.

Nolan McCarty’s research interests include U.S. politics, democratic political institutions, and political game theory. He is the co-author of two books: Political Game Theory (2006, Cambridge University Press with Adam Meirowitz) and Polarized America: The Dance of Ideology and Unequal Riches (2006, MIT Press with Keith Poole and Howard Rosenthal). During academic year 2007-2008, he was the acting dean of the Woodrow Wilson School.

Steve Rogers is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Politics whose research interests include parties and electoral institutions with a historical and state level focus. Prior to arriving at Princeton, he worked for the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee, the Missouri Democratic Party, and Kerry-Edwards 2004. He holds a M.A. (2008) and B.A. (2007) in political science from The George Washington University.

David Welna became NPR's congressional correspondent during the final days of the Clinton administration. He had earlier covered campaigns for the November 2000 election and the post-election vote count battle in Florida. He also has reported for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, The Financial Times, and The Times of London.

This event is co-sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics. It is open to the public. To receive notification about all our events, please sign up for our events e-newsletter.
 

11.15.2010
The Woodrow Wilson School hosted a post mid-term elections panel discussion titled, "A Midcourse Correction? The 2010 Elections in Perspective," at 4:30 p.m. on Monday, November 15, in Bowl 016, Robertson Hall. Panelists included Brandice Canes-Wrone, a Professor of Politics and Public Affairs and Faculty Chair of the Undergraduate...