WWS Calendar

Daniel K. Tarullo, Member, Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System

Apr 4, 2017 04:30PM to 06:30PM
Location: 
Robertson Hall

Tags: 

Audience: 
Open to the Public
Speaker(s): 
Daniel K. Tarullo, Member, Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System

Daniel K. Tarullo, a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, submitted his letter of resignation Feb. 10 to President Donald Trump, indicating he would resign his position on or around April 5.

As chairman of the Board’s Committee on Supervision and Regulation, which is responsible for regulating and supervising large and small banks since the 2008 financial crisis, Governor Tarullo is known as the Federal Reserve’s top financial regulator.

Tarullo was appointed to the Board by President Obama and took office on Jan. 28, 2009, to fill an unexpired term ending Jan. 31, 2022. Prior to his appointment to the Board, Tarullo was professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught courses in international financial regulation, international law and banking law. Prior to joining the Georgetown Law faculty, Tarullo held several senior positions in the Clinton administration.

From 1993 to 1998, Tarullo served, successively, as assistant secretary of state for economic and business affairs, deputy assistant to the president for economic policy and assistant to the president for international economic policy. He also served as a principal on both the National Economic Council and the National Security Council. From 1995 to 1998, Tarullo served as President Clinton’s personal representative to the G7/G8 group of industrialized nations.

Before joining the Clinton administration, Tarullo served as chief counsel for employment policy on the staff of the late Senator Ted Kennedy and practiced law in Washington, D.C. He also worked in the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice and as special assistant to the undersecretary of commerce. From 1981 to 1987, Tarullo taught at Harvard Law School.

Tarullo has also served as a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and as a non-resident senior fellow at the Center for American Progress. He has also held a visiting professorship at Princeton University.