WWS Calendar

Conservative movement of the '70s and today subject of discussion, April 9

Apr 9, 2008 (All day)
Audience: 
Open to the Public

“Rightward Bound: Making America Conservative in the 1970s and What That Means in 2008,” will be the topic of a panel discussion at the Woodrow Wilson School on Wednesday, April 9, at 4:30 p.m. in Bowl 016, Robertson Hall, on the Princeton University campus.

Panel discussants will include Bill Berkowitz, freelance writer and contributor to Media Transparency and Inter Press Service; Bruce Schulman, a professor of history at Boston University; Paul Starr, the Stuart Professor of Communications and Public Affairs and a professor of sociology and public affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School; and Julian Zelizer, a professor of history and public affairs at the School.

Bill Berkowitz has been tracking and monitoring conservative political and social movements in the United States for the past twenty-five-plus years. In 1977 he helped found the DataCenter, a research library and information center for social activists and investigative journalists, and became founding editor of the Center’s CultureWatch newsletter; one of the first national publications systematically tracking the conservative movement from the mid-1990s through the 2000 presidential election. In 2005, he was given the Journalism Award by the Before Columbus Foundation.

Schulman is the author and editor of several books including his latest, co-edited with Julian Zelizer, “Rightward Bound: Making America Conservative in the 1970s.” He previously served as director of the History Project in California, a joint effort of the University of California and the California State Department of Education to improve history education in the public schools. As an associate professor at UCLA, Schulman received the Luckman Distinguished Teaching Award and the Eby Award for the Art of Teaching. He also served as director of the American and New England studies program at Boston University.

Paul Starr is professor of sociology and public affairs at Princeton University and Stuart professor of communications and public affairs, WWS. He is also the co-editor (with Robert Kuttner) and co-founder (with Robert Kuttner and Robert Reich) of The American Prospect, a notable liberal magazine which was created in 1990. In 1993 Starr served as senior advisor for President Bill Clinton’s proposed health care reform plan. He received the 1984 Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction and Bancroft Prize in American History for "The Social Transformation of American Medicine" and the 2005 Goldsmith Book Prize for "The Creation of the Media." His most recent book, "Freedom's Power," on the history and promise of liberalism, will be out in paperback in spring 2008. He has written extensively on American society, politics, and both domestic and foreign policy.

Julian Zelizer’s research interests include Congress, 20th Century American Presidency and democracy. Author of several books, his most recent is titled “Rightward Bound: Making America Conservative in the 1970s.” The book, co-edited with Bruce Schulman, is a compilation of essays that examine the 1970s, the time between the liberal Sixties and Reagan’s Eighties; a significant moral and cultural turning point in which the conservative movement became the motive force driving politics for the ensuing three decades. Zelizer is a frequent commentator in the international and national media on political history and contemporary politics.

This discussion is sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and is free and open to the public.

04.09.2008
Panelists: Bill Berkowitz, Freelance writer and contributor to Media Transparency and Inter Press Service; Bruce Schulman, Professor of History, Boston University; Paul Starr, Stuart Professor of Communications and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Julian Zelizer, Professor of History and Public Affairs,...