Alumni

Robertson Hall
  • Economic Fellowship
    • Diane Alexander- Diane received her undergraduate degree in Economics from Berkeley in 2005 before joining Princeton's Economics Ph.D. program in 2010. She is interested in development and health economics, including the economics of health care, nutrition, and the effects of health on growth and development. Her current research focuses on infant health, specifically the effectiveness of medical treatment and the consequences of the high and increasing use of C-sections in the United States.

      Arpita Chatterjee

    • Arpita Chatterjee
      Arpita is a lecturer of economics at the University of New South Wales, Australian School of Business. She earned a Ph.D. in Economics and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2010, a B.Sc. from Presidency College in Calcutta, and an M.S. in Quantitative Economics from the Indian Statistical Institute in Calcutta. Her research interests are in applied and theoretical research on macroeconomic policies for both developed and developing countries and especially how these policies interact with globalization.

    • Tatiana HomonoffTatiana Homonoff
      Tatiana is an assistant professor of Human Ecology at Cornell University College of Human Ecology. She earned a Ph.D. in Economics and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2013 and a BA from Brown University in Applied Math and Economics. Her research focuses on identifying areas in which behavioral economics can improve social policy, primarily in the areas of public finance, health, labor, and environmental economics.

    • Diana LeeDiana Lee
      Diana works for the Boston Consulting Group in New York City. She earned a Ph.D. in Development Economics and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2010 and a BA in economics from Yale University. Her research focuses on understanding the effects of sex-selective abortion on fertility and education. She currently works for the Boston Consulting Group in New York City.

    • Christian Moser- Christian completed his undergraduate studies in Economics and Mathematics at the University of St. Andrews in the UK and at the University of California, Los Angeles before joining the Economics Ph.D. program at Princeton in fall 2010. His research focuses on the intersection of macro- and development economics, in particular on the mechanics of accumulation (growth) and distribution (inequality) of resources across heterogeneous societies.

    • Brice Richard Brice earned a B.SC in Engineering Science and a M.Sc. in Economics and Public Policy and Statistics from École Polytechnique in Paris, France. He earned a M.A. in Economics from Princeton University in 2011 and is expected to earn his Ph.D. in Economics in May 2014. He is currently working with Cornerstone Research in San Francisco, CA.

    • Dean SpearsDean Spears
      Dean works for Rice Institute. He earned a Ph.D. in Economics and Social Policy from Princeton University, a MA in Economics and MPA in Development Studies from Princeton, a MAIS from the School of International and Area Studies at the University of Oklahoma, and a BA in International Studies from the University of Oklahoma. His research focuses on children's health and height, sanitation, latrines, and hand washing soap.  
  • Politics
    • Carolyn Abbott- Carolyn Abott received her B.A. in Economics from Swarthmore College in 2008. She entered Princeton in 2010 after serving as an assistant economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Her interests include macro political economy, state and local politics, the American welfare state, and the politics of privatization. Carolyn is currently studying the political determinants of public debt and the effects of public spending on inequality.

    • Michael Becher
      Michael is an junior professor of political economy at the University of Konstanz in Germany. He earned a Ph.D. in politics and social policy from Princeton University in 2013 and a BA in political science and economics from Mannheim University in 2008. His research focuses on comparative politics and political economy with an emphasis on the consequences of political institutions for economic policies, performance, and presentation. In his dissertation, he examines the effects of democratic constitutions on redistribution.

    • Nicholas CarnesNicholas Carnes
      Nick is a lecturer in public policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University and a faculty affiliate of the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy. He earned a Ph.D. in politics and social policy from Princeton University in 2011 and a BA in political science from the University of Tulsa in 2006. His research interests include American politics, economic and social class inequality, political representation, legislative decision making, and urban politics.

    • Erica CzajaErica Czaja
      Erica earned a Ph.D. in politics and social policy from Princeton University in 2013, a M.A. in social sciences from the University of Chicago in 2006 and a B.A. with high distinction in psychology from the University of Michigan in 2003. Her research interests include public opinion, social policy, political communication, race, gender, and inequality.

    • Michael DonnellyMichael Donnelly
      Michael is the Max Weber Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Department of Social and Political Sciences at the European University Institute. He earned a Ph.D. in Politics and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2013. His research applies a variety of methods to important questions in comparative politics, with an emphasis on the intersection between broad social structures, public opinion, and political behavior. He has a special interest in how material interests and identity interact to shape political attitudes such as support for the welfare state.

    • Yanilda GonzalezYanilda Gonzalez
      Yanilda is a Post-Doctoral Research Scientist at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at Harvard University. He earned a PhD in Politics in 2014. Her interests include comparative politics, Latin American politics, state formation, state capacity, citizenship, political participation, citizen security, race and ethnicity.

    • Matthew IncantalupoMatthew Incantalupo 
      Matthew Incantalupo received his undergraduate degree in Political Science from the University of Miami in 2007. He entered Princeton in the Fall of that year to pursue a Ph.D. in Politics. He is interested primarily in public opinion, with secondary interests in voting, the mass media, race and politics, and social welfare policy. His current research focuses on the use of informational cues in formulating opinions about specific social welfare policies.

    • Marcus Johnson- Marcus received his B.A. in Political Science and Spanish from the University of Maryland in 2011. He is a first year graduate student in the Politics Department with a concentration in comparative politics. His research interests include the political effects of the migration of marginalized populations. Marcus is currently studying the effects of emigration on political engagement and national identity in Mexico.

    • Vladimir Medenica- Vladimir received undergraduate degrees in Psychology and Political Science from the University of Southern California in 2012. He entered the Politics department at Princeton in the Fall of that same year. Vladimir’s research interests focus on issues of social and economic inequality, race/ethnic politics, and political behavior and opinion in the U.S.

    • Herschel NachlisHerschel Nachlis 
      Herschel Nachlis is an Assistant Professor of Government at Franklin and marshall College. He earned a PhD in Politics in 2014 from Princeton University. His research and teaching interests focus on American political institutions, public law, and health policy. For more information, please visit http://scholar.princeton.edu/hnachlis.

    • Meredith SadinMeredith Sadin
      Meredith is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar in Health Policy Research at the University of California- Berkeley and San Francisco. She earned her PhD in Politics in 2014. Her research focuses on political behavior, political psychology, experimental methods and social and economic inequality. Her research explores the ways in which citizens use social class stereotypes about the rich in forming their policy preferences, selecting candidates, and making political decisions. For more information, go to meredithsadin.com.

    • Matthew Tokeshi
      Matt received a BA in Political Science and Psychology fromt he University of California, Berkeley in 2006. He entered Princeton in the Fall of 2010 where he specialized in U.S. politics. Matt's primary research interests are in racial and ethnic politics, public opinion, political psychology, and political behavior. He earned his Ph.D. in 2016.

    • Jacquelyn Waddell Boie
      Jaquelyn completed a BA in Psychology, Sociology, and Philosophy at Iowa State University in 2003 and a Master's in Public Policy at the University of Minnesota in 2008. She entered doctoral studies in Princeton's Department of Politics during the fall of 2008 with concentrations in international Relations and Political Methodology. Jaquilyn's research interest center on minority group repression and ethnic politics. She earned her Ph.D. in 2015.

  • Population Studies
    • Ayesha Mahmud Ayesha Mahmud- Ayesha Mahmud earned a B.A. in Physics and Economics from Carleton College (2009). After graduation, Ayesha joined NORC at the University of Chicago, where she worked on various health policy issues, such as childhood obesity, vaccination policy and health information technology. Before coming to Princeton, Ayesha worked at the National Bureau of Economic Research where she studied the determinants of health insurance plan choice. She is interested in reproductive health and access to healthcare in developing countries.

    • Zitsi Mirakhur- Zitsi earned a B.A. in Comparative Human Development from the University of Chicago in 2008. She entered Princeton University in 2011. Her research interests include sociology of education, poverty, inequality, and urbanization.  

    • Laura Baronoff Nolan

      Laura received her Ph.D. in 2015, a MSc from the Harvard School of Public Health in 2011 and her BA from Tufts University in 2006.  Her interests include inequalities in maternal, child, sexual and reproductive health and development in low and middle income countries. She is currently a Postdoctoral Research Scientist at Columbia University School of Social Work in the Columbia Population Research Center.

  • Psychology
    • Courtney Bearns
      Courtney received her Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Policy in 2015 and a B.A. in Psychology from Williams College in 2007. Her main research interests lie broadly in the study of intergroup relations, with a particular emphasis on the psychological processes relating to social inequality. She is currently working at Keystone: economic & Strategy Consulting for Technology Companies.Hilary Bergsieker

    • Hilary Bergsieker
      Hilary is an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. She earned a Ph.D. in psychology and social policy from Princeton University in 2012 and B.A. in psychology and German studies from Stanford University in 2003. Her current research examines the interpersonal dynamics of interracial interactions, as well as the content and expression of group stereotypes.

    • Shane Blackman
      Shane earned a Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2014. His research interest lie broadly in factors contributing to intragroup stability, cohesion, and homogeneity. Current work focuses on attitude changes in group contexts, conformity, and group-based decision-making.

    • Mina Cikara
      Mina is an assistant professor in the department of social and decision sciences in Dietrich College at Carnegie Mellon University. She earned a Ph.D. in psychology and social policy from Princeton University in 2010 and a B.A. in psychology from Vassar College. Mina uses social and cognitive neuroscience approaches to study how group membership and prejudice disrupt the processes that allow people to see others as human and to empathize with others. She is equally interested in the behavioral consequences of these processes. Her primary line of research examines the conditions under which social groups and individuals are denied social value, agency, and empathy.

    • Cydney DupreeCydney Dupree- Cydney completed her B.A. in Psychology at Brown University in 2011. Before coming to Princeton, she worked at the Social Cognitive Sciences Research Center and the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, both based at Brown. Her research interests center around the impact of social belonging on human functioning, with a current focus on self-presentation in inter- and intra-group settings.

    • Matthew KuglerMatthew Kugler
      Matthew is currently a student at the University of Chicago Law School. He earned a Ph.D in psychology and social policy from Princeton University in 2010 and a BA in psychology and political science from Williams College in 2005. His research addresses questions at the intersection of psychology with law and politics.

    • Tiane LeeTiane Lee
      Tiane accepted a position as Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Maryland. She earned a Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2010 and a BA in Psychology and Political Science from Stanford University.

    • Michael NorthMichael North
      Michael is a Post-Doctoral Researcher at Columbia University. He earned a Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Policy from Princeton University. His work centers on subtle yet significant elements of everyday person perception. His approach to these topics builds primarily upon the psychological literature on stereotypes, power/status, and impression formation, and presents applications to management and policy in particular.

    • Christopher OlivolaChristopher Olivola
      Chris is a Newton Fellow at the University College, London. He earned a Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2009 and a BA in Psychology from the University of Chicago. His research interests are in the psychology of human decision making and behavioral economics.

    • Ann Marie RussellAnn Marie Russell
      Ann Marie is the director of Institutional Research, Analysis and Planning at Bates University. She earned a Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Policy in 2012 from Princeton University and a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2001. Her research at Princeton revolved around themes of intergroup relations, social power, and various sociopolitical phenomena that foster and reinforce economic inequality.

    • Abigail SussmanAbigail Sussman
      Abigail is an assistant professor of marketing at the University of Chicago School of Business. She earned a Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Policy from Princeton University and a BA from Brown University in Cognitive Science and Economics. Her central research examines psychological biases that can lead consumers to commit errors in budgeting, spending, and borrowing.

    • Jillian Swencionis - Jillian earned her Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Policy in 2016. She accepted a research position at teh Center for Policing Equity at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Her research investigates the dynamics of interpersonal interactions across social class and racial boundaries with an eye toward how behavioral science can inform policy and how policy can influence behavior.

    • Matthew TrujilloMatthew Trujillo
      Matt is a research associate at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He earned a Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Policy from Princeton University and a BA in Psychology from Arizona State University. His research interest includes prejudice and stereotyping with a focus on ethnic and racial identity.

  • Sociology
    • Maria Abascal- Maria received her B.A. in Sociology from Columbia University in 2009 and entered Princeton that fall. Maria's interests include political sociology, political inequality, and immigration. With funding from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Maria is currently working on a project detailing the relationship between immigrants' political socialization and their area of settlement.

    • Edward Berchick- Ed received his Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy in 2015 from Princeton University. He received a B.A. in Health & Societies and Philosophy from the University of Pennsylvania in 2008 and his M.P.H. from Yale University in 2010. His research focuses on the relationship between health and inequality across people, populations, and cohorts. Edward's previous research examined socioeconomic inequality and the health consequences of involuntary job loss. He is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Sociology Department at Duke University.

    • Sarah Brayne
      Sarah earned a Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2015 and B.A. (Hons) in Sociology from the University of British Columbia. In her dissertation research, she analyzes the use of Big Data in the criminal justice system. Sarah is part of the Prison Teaching Initiative, teaching sociology classes at a state prison in New Jersey. She is the recipient of a doctoral fellowship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Sarah is currently an assistant professor of Sociology at The University of Texas at Austin.Elizabeth Derickson

    • Elizabeth Derickson - Liz is currently the Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs at Swarthmore College. She received her B.A. in Psychology and Public Policy from Swarthmore College in 2001, and she entered Princeton in 2008. Her areas of interest include neighborhoods, poverty, race and inequality.

    • René Flores -René is a research fellow in health management and policy at the University of Michigan. He earned a Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy at Princeton University in 2014. His research interests include immigration, race and ethnicity, and contemporary international political economy. He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate

    • Lauren Gaydosh
      Lauren received her her Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2015 and a BA in Sociology and Women's Studies from the University of Pennsylvania in 2007. Afterwards, Lauren worked on health research projects in Southern Africa before entering Princeton in 2009. Lauren's interests include adult morbidity and mortality, health, development, and urban inequality in Africa. Lauren is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. She is currently a Postdoctoral researcher at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

    • Julia Gelatt - Julia is a research associate at the Urban Institute. She earned a Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2013, and a BA from Carleton College in 2004, where she majored in Sociology and Anthropology and concentrated in Latin American studies. Her research interests lie in international migration and immigrant assimilation, focusing on the U.S. She is particularly interested in the development and effects of local immigration ordinances and their relationship to rising income inequality.

    • Aaron Gottlieb - Aaron earned his Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy in 2016. He accepted an Assistant Professor position with the Jane Addams College of Social Work. His research includes the impact of message frames on public attitudes towards criminal justice sentencing reform, the impact of cross-national variation in incarceration rates on inequality outcomes, determinants of cross-country differences in incarceration rates, inequality and left institutions, partnership stages, partner education and criminal offending.

    • Patrick Ishizuka - Patrick earned his Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy in 2016. He accepted a Postdoctoral Fellow position at Cornell University College of Human Ecology. Broadly, his research investigates the causes and consequences of socioeconomic and gender inequalities in the family and labor market, families, economic inequality, gender, and the work-family intersection.

    • Alexandra MurphyAlexandra Murphy
      Alex is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan. She earned a Ph.D. in sociology and social policy from Princeton University in 2012 and a B.A. in Urban Studies and Sociology from Barnard College at Columbia University in 2003. Her areas of interest include urban sociology, ethnography, poverty, and race.

    • Rourke O'Brien
      Rourke is an assistant professor of public policy at the University of Wisconsin. He earned a Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2014. His research interests include household finance, taxation, and comparative social welfare policy. His ongoing research includes analyzing the social determinants of taxation, patterns of infomral financial assistance, and teh role of disability programs in teh social safety net. He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

      David Pedulla
      David is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Texas in Austin. His research interests include low-wage work, social stratification, economic sociology, and inequality.  Prior to starting graduate studies at Princeton, David worked on issues of economic justice and protecting teh rights fo low-income communities through research  and fellowship positions. For more information go to www.davidpedulla.org

      Michelle Phelps
      Michelle is an assistant professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota, a faculty affiliate at the Minnesota Population Center and the Robina Institute of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice. She earned a Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2013 and a B.A. in Psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. Her research is in the sociology of punishment, focusing in particular on the punitive turn in the U.S.

    • Daniel SchneiderDaniel Schneider
      Danny is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of California at Berkeley. He earned a Ph.D. in sociology and social policy from Princeton University in 2012 and a BA in public policy and American Institutions from Brown University in 2003. His research is focused in the areas of family demography, economic sociology, gender, inequality, and social policy. More specifically, his work focuses on the family as a key mechanism in the production of race, class, and gender inequalities.

    • Naomi Sugie
      Naomi is an assistant professor of criminology at the University of California, Irvine. She earned a Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2014. She is interested in issues of inequality, race, and the criminal justice system, with a particular focus on the social and economic consequences of mass incarceration on offenders.

    • Erik Vickstrom
      Erik is with the U.S. Census Bureau in Washington, DC. He earned a Ph.D. in sociology and social policy from Princeton University in 2013 and a B.A. in sociology and American studies from Wesleyan University in 1998. Erik studies international migration both within and from West Africa, and has spent time in Senegal working on the MAFE (Migration between Africa and Europe) project. In addition to migration, Erik's interests include development, inequality, and social networks.

    • Kevin WoodsonKevin Woodson - Kevin is an assistant professor of law at the Earle Mack School of Law at Drexel University. He earned a Ph.D. in sociology and social policy from Princeton University in 2011, a law degree from Yale University in 2003, and a BA in political science from Columbia University in 2000. His emphasis at Princeton was on the problems of the Black middle class and the virtues and limitations of legal strategies for addressing racial inequality