WWS Blog: 2016

Dec 27, 2016
Public Affairs
Should the government play a major or minor role in the lives of American citizens? This core question resurfaces during each election and continues to divide the political parties. It turns out that this argument is not new. In his newest book, Yale historian Steve Pincus challenges those who argue that the Declaration of Independence should be used for political guidance today, saying it’s in favor of limited government. Pincus shows that the...
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Dec 20, 2016
B. Rose Kelly
Polarization was a strong undercurrent to the 2016 presidential election, powerfully affecting the electorate and politics. Looking toward President-elect Donald Trump’s cabinet appointments, those same divisions remain clear. As Trump builds his team, the nation is beginning to see the outlines of a Trump administration - one that fits well with congressional Republicans.  */ In their first live recording of Politics & Polls, professors...
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Dec 16, 2016
B. Rose Kelly
More than two years after the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, the fraught relationship between law enforcement and African Americans continues to spark controversy and calls for action. This tension — and how to address the divide between communities and the police — were examined at a policy forum held Friday, Dec. 9, at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. The daylong forum, "From...
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Dec 13, 2016
Public Affairs
Since Donald Trump’s election, there has been considerable debate about what the Democratic party should do next. While some Democrats argue for an openness to cooperation, others insist there isn’t room for compromise given Trump’s views on race and individual rights.   In this episode of Politics & Polls, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview one of the most powerful voices in this debate: Jamelle Bouie.   In his writing, Bouie...
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Dec 9, 2016
As you put the final touches on your applications to the MPA, MPP and Ph.D. programs, be sure to review the application tips recently posted to the admissions blog. For your reference, the links are posted below.   Getting In Policy Memo Writing Tips What Counts as Relevant Work Experience? 2017 Application Countdown, Part 1 - Letters of Recommendation 2017 Application Countdown, Part 2 - Personal Statement 2017 Application Countdown, Part 3 -...
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Dec 7, 2016
Public Affairs
In this episode of Politics & Polls, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview Linda Greenhouse about how a Trump presidency may affect the U.S. Supreme Court. Greenhouse is the Knight Distinguished Journalist in Residence and Joseph Goldstein Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School. She covered the Supreme Court for The New York Times between 1978 and 2008 and writes a biweekly column on law. She’s the author of several books, including,...
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Dec 7, 2016
Perhaps you are thinking about coming back to school after working full-time for a number of years. Maybe you’ve been in the for-profit sector and want to pivot to the public sector. Or maybe you are already in the public sector and want to hone your skills. Whatever the case, you may be wondering whether returning to school is the right move, and if so, whether the Woodrow Wilson School is the right place for you. I was in your shoes at this...
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Dec 6, 2016
The Ingredients of a Strong Résumé Use a two page annotated format.  Begin with paid Professional Work Experience. Provide date, job title and employer. Under each one, provide a brief paragraph of your key assignments and important accomplishments. Some bullet points are fine, but be judicious; substance is more important than format. Include a separate section on Leadership and Public Service. Include examples of leadership in college,...
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Dec 5, 2016
GRE Scores and the Dec. 15 Deadline WWS is flexible on the receipt of GRE scores for applicants who either retake the GRE or could not schedule the test before the Dec. 15 deadline. During the past 20 years, GRE testing has moved from paper- to computer-based administration, but not in all countries. The one constant is that it is difficult to control all of the externalities that affect taking the GRE, including: unforeseen professional travel...
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Dec 5, 2016
The Evaluation of Transcripts & GRE Scores The beauty of the admission process to schools of public and international affairs is that the applicant pool is relatively small in comparison to other professional graduate schools of law, business, engineering and medicine. We do not use a matrix or formula for GPAs and GRE scores because the content behind those points of data is what we value most. We focus mostly on your performance in courses...
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Dec 2, 2016
How to Build Momentum in a Personal Statement The personal statement must “smell authentic” meaning that it could never be possible to confuse it with any other applicant. To be compelling, your story must be told with humility while also highlighting your strengths and leadership. Begin your personal statement by telling your story of public service and your contributions to the public good. Define your passion for specific policy issues and...
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Dec 1, 2016
Carly Millenson
On Nov. 19, 2016, Princeton University's Center for International Security Studies (CISS) hosted more than 100 students at its annual fall crisis simulation. In addition to nearly 60 total undergraduate and graduate Princeton students, participants came from West Point, the Naval Academy, the New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University to grapple with an imagined scenario in which political instability in Pakistan created regional...
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Dec 1, 2016
The Dec. 15 deadline to submit MPA, MPP and Ph.D. applications for Fall 2017 is quickly approaching. The admissions office will post short reminders of what applicants should include as they complete their applications. Check back for more reminders and tips.  Letters of Recommendation By virtue of the small class sizes of the MPA, MPP, and Ph.D. cohorts, admission to each program is competitive; in crafting a diverse class each year, it becomes...
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Nov 29, 2016
Sarah M. Binder
Every July, about 20 mid-career professionals convene at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, hailing from locations as varied as Gaborone, Botswana; Dayton, Ohio; and London, United Kingdom. Each has a minimum of seven years of public or nonprofit sector work experience, with organizations such as the U.S. Department of State, Israel’s National Cyber Bureau and the New York City Police Department....
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Nov 22, 2016
B. Rose Kelly
Facebook — which has been raked over the coals for allowing the dissemination of fake news stories about the 2016 election — is now taking a hard and careful look at what role it may have played among American voters. Some say the election results illustrate a social media “echo chamber,” in which users gather news and information primarily from friends with shared interests. What are the effects of these echo chambers and silos? Are there ways...
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Nov 18, 2016
Public Affairs
Political polarization is the worst it’s been since the Civil War, some experts argue. How did we get here? How have America’s ideologies shifted so much in the past four decades? What forces underlie the growing divide between Republicans and Democrats? And how has social media and varying sources of information widened the gap? */ In episode 21, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang discuss party polarization with Matt Grossman and David...
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Nov 16, 2016
During the campaign, President-Elect Donald Trump said he would repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a system that covers 20 million people who were previously uninsured. Now, Trump says he’ll hold on to certain ACA provisions, such as providing care for those with pre-existing conditions. Regardless of what’s being said about the ACA (also known as Obamacare), there are likely to be changes, according to Princeton’s top health care experts. In...
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Nov 11, 2016
Public Affairs
The Woodrow Wilson School is hosting a series of "Up to the Minute" events to debrief the election results and discuss the country's path forward. Each event will be livestreamed on our YouTube Channel.   We encourage prospective students to join the conversation on Twitter and submit questions for our speakers using #WooLection16.   November 14: Post-Election Impact on Inequality, Discrimination and Well-Being November 17: Election 2016 Debrief...
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Nov 10, 2016
Public Affairs
In a stunning upset, Donald Trump was elected the 45th president of the United States. Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang react to the results in episode #20, their first post-election recording. Among a host of issues, they discuss why the polls might have been off and what a Trump presidency means to the nation and the history of democracy. Podcast Here */
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Nov 8, 2016
*/ In their last episode before the election, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang look ahead to election day 2016. Among other issues, they discuss what the results will do to the GOP, which states Wang in particular will be watching on election night (hint: it’s not what you’d think), how the Senate races might turn out and if this particular election may shape political discourse in 2020 and beyond. Podcast Here
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Oct 31, 2016
Public Affairs
Who knew that the discharge petition—signed by members of the House of Representatives to bring a bill from committee to the floor—could be good material for a Tony Award-winning play and HBO feature film? In this episode, Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview Robert Schenkkan whose play “All the Way” about Lyndon B. Johnson has been brought from the stage to the screen. “All the Way” is a play and film depicting LBJ’s efforts to...
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Oct 28, 2016
Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications; B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
Wednesday's face-off between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump marked the third and final presidential debate of the 2016 campaign. Those debates, which gave tens of millions of Americans the opportunity to see the top two candidates discuss key campaign topics, were organized and conducted by the independent, nonprofit Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD). Shirley M. Tilghman, president of the University, emeritus, and professor of molecular...
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Oct 26, 2016
Public Affairs
Donald Trump has made it clear that if he loses on Nov. 8, it is because the election was “rigged.” He has warned that there might be widespread voter fraud that will favor Democrats. But does this threat have any basis in reality? Or is the real threat new voter identification laws that have the potential to disenfranchise significant portions of the population? And why, after a century of working to expand the right to vote, have we seen the...
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Oct 24, 2016
Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
The next president will face a range of challenges related to race and inequality, from poverty and tensions with police to the Black Lives Matter movement, civil rights, incarceration and gender equity. In the sixth installment of a Q&A series on important issues the next president will need to address, Princeton University professors Imani Perry and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor examine challenges related to race. Full Story
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Oct 21, 2016
Public Affairs
What happens in the House and Senate races will ultimately shape and influence the next presidency. And many questions remain: What will the Trump effect be on congressional races? What impact will this have in the Senate? Is there any possibility that the House, currently with a large Republican majority, could swing to the Democrats? And will the Freedom Caucus expand or contract in size, and what challenges will this pose House Speaker Paul...
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Oct 20, 2016
Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications; B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
The challenges facing the next president will span the globe, from Russia to the Middle East to China and beyond. In the fifth installment of a Q&A series on important issues the next president will need to address, Princeton University researchers Aaron Friedberg and G. John Ikenberry examine foreign policy challenges. Full Story
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Oct 17, 2016
Karin Dienst, Office of Communications
Princeton University will present its top honors for alumni to Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Alphabet Inc., and Pedro Pablo Kuczynski, president of Peru. Schmidt, a member of the Class of 1976, will receive the Woodrow Wilson Award. Kuczynski, who earned a Master in Public Affairs in 1961 from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, will receive the James Madison Medal. They will receive the awards and deliver...
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Oct 14, 2016
Public Affairs
The issue of voting rights in America has been long debated and has changed dramatically since the country was founded. From then until now, Americans have fought for the right to vote, while many tried to stop them. In episode 14, professors Julian E. Zelizer and Sam Wang interview Michael Waldman, author of “The Fight to Vote,” a book chronicling the long struggle to win voting rights for all citizens. Podcast Here
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Oct 11, 2016
Michael Hotchkiss and B. Rose Kelly
The next president will have his or her hands full regarding issues in the Middle East: the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) remains a threat; the integrity of the Iran nuclear accord must be ensured; and decisions loom about the United States’ role in Syria. In the fourth installment of a Q&A series on challenges that will face the new president, Princeton University researchers Amb. Daniel Kurtzer and Jacob N. Shapiro examine these...
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Oct 6, 2016
Public Affairs
A previously unknown subculture has emerged onto the political scene thanks to the 2016 presidential election. The alternative right, known as the “alt-right,” is a diverse group of people who identify as right-wing and are unified in opposition against mainstream American conservatism. In episode 13, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview Rick Perlstein, author of The New York Times bestseller “Nixonland: The Rise of a President and...
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Oct 5, 2016
Michael Hotchkiss and B. Rose Kelly
Issues related to health — at the personal, community and global scales — will challenge the next president, both in his or her first 100 days and throughout the next four years. In the third part of a Q&A series on challenges that will face the new president, Princeton University researchers Janet Currie, Heather Howard, Adel Mahmoud and Uwe Reinhardt examine a number of these issues. Full Story
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Sep 28, 2016
Michael Hotchkiss and B. Rose Kelly
Issues related to the environment and climate change will demand the new president's attention soon after he or she takes office Jan. 20 and throughout the next four years. In the second part of a Q&A series on challenges that will face the new president, Princeton University researchers Rob Nixon, Michael Oppenheimer and David Wilcove examine environmental and climate-change issues. Full Story
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Sep 26, 2016
Public Affairs
In "Failing in the Field," Dean Karlan and Jacob Appel, a current MPA candidate, delve into the common causes of failure in field research, so that researchers might avoid similar pitfalls in future work. Drawing on the experiences of top social scientists working in developing countries, the book delves into failed projects and helps guide practitioners as they embark on their research. From experimental design and implementation to analysis...
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Sep 23, 2016
Sarah M. Binder
The MacArthur Foundation has named José A. Quiñonez a 2016 MacArthur Fellow. Quiñonez, who earned a Master of Public Affairs degree in 1998 from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, joins 22 additional fellows named to the foundation’s class this year. A financial entrepreneur, Quiñonez helps low-income, immigrant and minority families develop their full economic potential by creating pathways to...
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Sep 23, 2016
Public Affairs
The presidential election is at a crossroads as the race is beginning to tighten between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Now, we’re entering a season of debates, with the first one kicking off Monday, Sept. 26, at 9 p.m. from Hofstra University in New York. Some predict this first debate could be the most-viewed in our history. But how might these debates influence voters? Podcast Here
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Sep 22, 2016
Public Affairs
Since Hillary Clinton was named nominee of the Democratic Party, commentators have been taking a hard look at the way gender impacts the political process. Yet, when it comes to gender, it is rarely a clear-cut or easy discussion. Working to disentangle the role of gender in politics is award-winning journalist Rebecca Traister, the best-selling author of “All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation.” In this...
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Sep 21, 2016
Mel Policicchio, Woodrow Wilson School
In 2005, Maribel Hernández Rivera MPA ’10 was a first-year master’s student at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and spent much of her time outside the classroom organizing rallies and encouraging her peers to advocate for immigration reform.   Carrying this passion and dedication into her professional career, Hernández Rivera became the first executive director of legal initiatives at the New York...
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Sep 13, 2016
Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications; B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
The next president will face a range of economic challenges from his or her first moment in office. In this Q&A, Princeton economists Alan Krueger and Cecilia Rouse explore the key economic issues ahead for the nation in the short and long term. This is the first in a series of Q&A articles with Princeton University experts leading up to the election. Full Story
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Sep 8, 2016
Public Affairs
In one of the most powerful transformations in the history of American politics, African Americans shifted loyalties to the Democratic Party while Republicans became the party of racial conservatism.   How and why did this happen? Did certain moments in history cause this bipartisan ‘racial realignment?’ How has this realignment led to the political polarization of 2016?   In episode 10 of Politics & Polls, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam...
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Sep 8, 2016
Sarah M. Binder
Siddharth (Sid) Chatterjee, MPP ’11 has been appointed United Nations Resident Coordinator in Kenya, where he will help to lead and coordinate 25 UN agencies based in the country. He will also serve as the Resident Representative of the United Nations Development Programme. Prior to this appointment, Sid served as the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Representative in Kenya. At UNFPA, Sid and his team spearheaded efforts to reduce the...
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Sep 7, 2016
WWS Graduate Admissions Office
The application for the 2017 Public Policy & International Affairs Junior Summer Institute is now open.  Please spread the word!  The PPIA Junior Summer Institute program prepares undergraduates to be competitive  candidates for top degree programs in the fields of public policy, public administration or international affairs through participation in a Junior Summer Institute (JSI).  Learn More! PPIA is now accepting applications to the 2017...
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Aug 29, 2016
Public Affairs
Game-changing events often occur during presidential campaigns. These moments — which can transform party dynamics, voters and even the candidates themselves — oftentimes influence the outcome of the election.  But what about the 2016 presidential campaign? Have we seen moments like these? And, if we have, are they even worth looking back upon?  In episode nine of “Politics & Polls,” professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang close out the...
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Aug 25, 2016
Public Affairs
From straw polls of the 19th century to modern polling of today, polls have played a significant role in the American political landscape. But what is a poll? With dozens of new polls coming out every week, how can we make sense of the data onslaught? Is there a way to reduce the confusion? And what role can polls play in 2016, an election year fraught with drama and uncertainty? In episode eight of “Politics & Polls,” professors Julian...
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Aug 24, 2016
Michael Caddell, Princeton's Office of Career Services
This summer, more than 160 Princeton undergraduate students are spending their breaks interning at public service and nonprofit organizations in over 30 cities in the United States, Canada, Bermuda, Ireland and France as part of the Princeton Internships in Civic Service (PICS) program. They include Wilson School student Imani Williams, who is interested in global health. Williams is interning at a children's hospital in France and getting an...
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Aug 18, 2016
Mel Policicchio, Woodrow Wilson School
Professor Christopher Neilson is passionate about ensuring that government policy — in particular education policy — is founded on theory and measurement. He aspires to upend the typical formula where policymakers develop, implement and program, and then outside academics evaluate progress. Rather, he wants to make sure development and implementation go hand in hand with evaluation.  This is the concept behind his latest project: the Peruvian ...
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Aug 17, 2016
Michael Hotchkiss, Princeton Communications
It was a Princeton moment more than 3,600 miles from FitzRandolph Gate: two Princetonians standing together outside the presidential palace in Lima, Peru, on July 28, wearing business suits adorned with sashes in the red and white of their nation's flag. One was Pedro Pablo Kuczynski, the nation's newly elected president, who earned a Master in Public Affairs degree in 1961 from the University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International...
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Aug 11, 2016
Donald Trump has focused on easing tensions with the Republican Party this week by endorsing House Speaker Paul Ryan, Senator John McCain and Senator Susan Collins. But while these endorsements are intended to unify the ticket, it's not clear whether these Republican candidates actually want Trump's endorsement, as evidenced by Collins's refusal to support Trump. If disaffected Republicans like Collins stay home, this could spell trouble for...
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Aug 8, 2016
B. Rose Kelly
Frederick (Rick) Barton and Kathryn R. (Kit) Lunney have been named co-directors of the Scholars in the Nation's Service Initiative (SINSI) at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Established in 2006, SINSI is designed to encourage, support and prepare the nation’s top students to pursue careers in the U.S. government, both in international and domestic agencies, through academic training that is...
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Aug 4, 2016
Public Affairs
The media have played a powerful role in the 2016 presidential election. Some critics argue Donald Trump became a viable candidate thanks to his “free airtime,” and that he might not have won the Republican bid without the attention. Others point out blatant sexism in the media given the attention paid to Hillary Clinton’s voice and clothing—something reporters didn’t do as much with male candidates. And Bernie Sanders’ supporters contend “...
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Aug 3, 2016
Public Affairs
Within the grand speeches at this week’s Democratic National Convention lies a central message — Clinton and the Democrats, not Trump, can better serve struggling working and middle-class voters who have felt excluded from both parties. When both candidates return full-throttle to the campaign trail, they’ll be competing for these voters in key states such as Pennsylvania.   How has the Democratic Party’s relationship with these voters evolved...
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Aug 2, 2016
B. Rose Kelly
Barbara Hampton, a seasoned career services professional with a long-standing passion for helping students attain internships and jobs, joins Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs as director of graduate career services and alumni relations on Aug. 15.   “We are thrilled that Barbara will be joining the Woodrow Wilson School,” Dean Cecilia Rouse said. “I am confident that, given her impressive...
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Image of Carl Westphal
Jul 29, 2016
Elizabeth Martin, MPA '17
As an MPA student at the Woodrow Wilson School, I've been awed and advised by classmates, faculty, professors and alumni. My hope is that this ongoing series of alumni profiles, “WooSights,” will give you a sense of the generosity and depth of the Wilson School community and offer some insights into how alumni have made the most of the opportunities it provides. - Elizabeth Martin, MPA '17 Carl Westphal, MPA ‘13International Economist, Office of...
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Image of Rochelle Haynes
Jul 28, 2016
Mel Policicchio
New York City is home to more than 58,000 men, women and children living on the streets and relying on public sheltering systems for assistance. This pressing concern has always stood out to Rochelle Haynes, MPA-URP ’06, who is a native of the city. She has dedicated her career to eradicating homelessness and now works as chief of staff for New York City’s Department of Homeless Services.    After graduating from Princeton University’s Woodrow...
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Jul 28, 2016
Nick Donnoli, Princeton University Office of Communications
The Princeton University campus has a gentle hum of activity during the summer months. Faculty and students traverse the grounds on foot and on bicycles to engage in research and learning in libraries and laboratories. Visitors enjoy the art, architecture and recreational facilities. Along Lake Carnegie and in the University's many gardens, warm breezes blow through scenic vistas. Full Story Here.
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Jul 22, 2016
Public Affairs
Candidates for Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs usually enter the School's degree programs with real-world professional experience. Students with military backgrounds also bring a global viewpoint of the effect public policy has on the ground. Their leadership and experience in the field enriches classroom conversations. Full Story Here.
Voter Button & WooCast Logo
Jul 21, 2016
Public Affairs
It’s been an interesting week at the Republication National Convention in Cleveland. Donald Trump’s wife Melania was accused of plagiarizing her speech. Ted Cruz was booed offstage after failing to endorse Trump. And Hillary Clinton was called a “criminal” and compared to “Lucifer.”   Will such dramatic incidents have an impact on voters? Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang debate this issue and more in episode four of Politics & Polls....
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Picture of President Obama and WooCast Logo
Jul 18, 2016
Public Affairs
People often vote based on who’s already in the White House. So how does the incumbent party affect elections? And how is President Obama’s legacy influencing the current campaign? Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang debate this issue and more in episode three of Politics & Polls. Full Podcast Here.
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Election podcast
Jul 13, 2016
Public Affairs
Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will soon announce their running mates—but does the vice president pick still matter? While it was once used as a way to bring regional balance to the ticket, it's not clear what the vice president selection means in 2016. Tune in to the second episode of Politics & Polls as Professors Julian E. Zelizer and Sam Wang debate this issue and more. Full Podcast Here.
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Jul 11, 2016
Michael Hotchkiss and Jamie Saxon
Six Princeton professors talk about how the books on their shelves relate to their work, highlight one or two favorite books, and share what's on their own summer reading (and in one case, television binge-watching) lists in our second annual "Spinal tap" feature. On Wilson School Dean Cecilia Rouse's summer reading list: Louise Penny's Inspector Gamache books and the Neapolitan novels by Elena Ferrante. Full Story Here.
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Jul 1, 2016
Public Affairs
In 1964, Lyndon B. Johnson crushed Barry Goldwater in the presidential election. Could we see another landslide like this in 2016? Or does today’s political environment make that impossible? Tune in to the first episode of "Politics and Polls” as Professors Julian E. Zelizer and Sam Wang debate this issue and more. Full Podcast here.
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Jun 20, 2016
Susan B. Higgins
Eighteen high school students from 16 Pueblo Nations in New Mexico and two students from the Navajo Nation in Arizona are visiting the Woodrow Wilson School for Public and International Affairs this week as part of the Santa Fe Indian School Leadership Institute’s Summer Policy Academy (SPA). Full Story Here.
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Jun 15, 2016
B. Rose Kelly
Pedro Pablo Kuczynski MPA ’61, a liberal economist, has won the majority of votes in Peru’s presidential election. Full Story Here.
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Jun 13, 2016
B. Rose Kelly
Angus Deaton has been named a Knight Bachelor “for his services to research in economics and international affairs.” The honor entitles him to be known as Sir Angus, or Sir Angus Deaton, and was announced as part of the Queen’s official birthday honours list. Full Story Here.
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Jun 9, 2016
B. Rose Kelly
America’s drug epidemic could be better controlled by addressing the economic hardships facing rural America, Princeton University’s Keith Wailoo said at a recent Congressional briefing. The country must also consider how best to treat those suffering from chronic pain. Full Story Here.
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Jun 2, 2016
B. Rose Kelly
The Woodrow Wilson School awarded 83 graduate students and 144 undergraduate students with degrees at its May 31 Commencement and through the 2015-16 academic year. The Wilson School congratulates the five Ph.D. students, 60 Master in Public Affairs (MPA) students and 18 Master in Public Policy (MPP) students who graduated. Full Story Here.
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Jun 1, 2016
B. Rose Kelly
Cecilia Rouse, dean of Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School, was among the four Harvard University alumni to receive the Centennial Medal on May 25. Full Story Here.
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May 25, 2016
B. Rose Kelly; Translation by Bonelys Rosado and Hiram Beltran-Sanchez
This text is available in English and Spanish. Scroll down for the Spanish translation. El artículo está disponible en inglés y español. Desplacé el cursor hasta abajo para la versión en Español. Latinos in the United States typically live longer than whites — a phenomenon commonly referred to as the “Hispanic Paradox” or “Latino Mortality Advantage.” While not totally understood, these epidemiological findings have interested scholars, mostly...
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May 24, 2016
Public Affairs
Tishina Okegbe MPP ’16 also found her way to the Peace Corps as a means to find more fulfilling work. During her third year of a doctoral program in molecular biology, Okegbe realized that she needed a job with a more tangible impact on people. “I was spending a lot of time in the lab, a lot of time looking down a microscope and a lot of time doing dissections of very small parts of a fly’s body,” Okegbe said. As she considered her passions for...
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May 19, 2016
Susan B. Higgins
Concern for the health and well-being of others has long been a driving force for Marlise Pierre-Wright '12, MPA '16. As a Princeton University undergraduate student, this passion led her to assume several leadership roles on campus, including serving as a Healthy Minds peer advisor and a member of the Student Health Advisory Board. Full Story.
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May 13, 2016
Public Affairs
Growing up, Kevin McGinnis ’11, MPA ’15, never imagined he’d someday be advising the U.S. Secretary of Defense on national security policy and overseas military basing. Full Story Here.
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May 13, 2016
Elizabeth Martin, MPA '17
As an MPA student at the Woodrow Wilson School, I've been awed and advised by classmates, faculty, professors and alumni. My hope is that this new series of alumni profiles, “WooSights,” will give you a sense of the generosity and depth of the Wilson School community and offer some insights into how alumni have made the most of the opportunities it provides. --Elizabeth Martin - See more at: http://wws.princeton.edu/admissions/wws-blog/item/...
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May 11, 2016
B. Rose Kelly
Recent studies of mortality trends paint a gloomy picture for many middle-aged and older Americans, but a new study focused on children reveals a more optimistic future. Death rates have declined among children and young adults in the poorest counties in the United States, according to the study published in Science. These children may be more likely to be healthier as they grow older, regardless of the poverty level where they live, the...
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May 10, 2016
Susan B. Higgins
The 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference led to a historic agreement, in which 195 nations promised to reduce future greenhouse gas emissions. Questions still remain, however, as to how the global community will develop action plans to implement the agreement that are both scientifically and politically feasible. Three graduate students from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School chose to tackle these questions as part of a day-...
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May 9, 2016
Public Affairs
Princeton Research Day, held May 5, was a celebration of the research and creative endeavors by undergraduates, graduate students and postdoctoral researchers. The campus-wide event served as an opportunity for researchers and artists to share their work with the community and included research from the natural sciences, social sciences, engineering and humanities, with talks, posters, performances, art exhibitions, demonstrations, digital...
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May 5, 2016
Susan B. Higgins
Every year citizens flee their homelands to escape political instability, violent conflicts, environmental degradation and grinding poverty. In 2015 alone, roughly 1 million migrants sought a more secure future within the European Union (EU). Over the past few months, students in a Princeton University undergraduate policy task force have been studying the challenges EU leaders face in dealing with the migrant influx — and developing potential...
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May 5, 2016
Susan B. Higgins
The 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference led to a historic agreement, in which 195 nations promised to reduce future greenhouse gas emissions. Questions still remain, however, as to how the global community will develop action plans to implement the agreement that are both scientifically and politically feasible. Three graduate students from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School chose to tackle these questions as part of a day-...
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Apr 28, 2016
Public Affairs
Patrick Linn Patrick Linn MPA ’16 had always dreamt of joining the Peace Corps. He knew it would afford him the opportunity to live and work in a community that otherwise wouldn’t be accessible. He applied for the Peace Corps in 2009, but waited a few years before departing to ensure that he and his wife could volunteer in the same location. The wait was well worth it. Linn and his wife worked in the Kedougou region of southeastern Senegal,...
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Apr 27, 2016
Elizabeth Martin, MPA '17
As an MPA student at the Woodrow Wilson School, I've been awed and advised by classmates, faculty, professors and alumni. My hope is that this new series of alumni profiles, “WooSights,” will give you a sense of the generosity and depth of the Wilson School community and offer some insights into how alumni have made the most of the opportunities it provides. --Elizabeth Martin   Alicia Allison, MPA ’98 Director, Political Training Division,...
Apr 20, 2016
Public Affairs
Jeremey Taglieri Jeremey Taglieri MPA '17 also found himself in the Peace Corps after becoming disaffected with the institutionalized nature of academia. As a political science undergraduate, Taglieri enjoyed his studies, but was tired of what seemed to be "all talk" and "no action." I grew dissatisfied with the fact that we spent all this time talking about the world's problems but not actually doing (anything about" them," he said. After...
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Apr 19, 2016
Public Affairs
Home to the best college in the country, according to U.S. News & World Report, Princeton is located in Mercer county, right in the center of our state. The population is approximately 30,000, and it is both one of the oldest and newest towns in New Jersey. How is that possible? Though Princeton predates the Revolutionary War, it was established in its current state in 2013 when Princeton Township and the Borough of Princeton merged. Here...
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Apr 15, 2016
Public Affairs
John F. Kennedy founded the Peace Corps in 1961 with the goal of sending volunteers on two-year missions to aid developing nations while simultaneously helping Americans understand foreign cultures. Since then, more than 220,000 Americans have traveled to 140 countries to assist with projects ranging from education to agriculture to technology. The Peace Corps provides volunteers with housing and a stipend to cover food and incidentals, allowing...
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Apr 14, 2016
Susan B. Higgins
Benjamin Todd Jealous, former president and CEO of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and current partner at Kapor Capital - where he has been an adviser for multiple tech startups working to close gaps of access, opportunity and participation for everyday Americans - will serve as the John L. Weinberg/Goldman Sachs & Co. Visiting Professor and Visiting Lecturer in Public and International Affairs at...
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Adam Kent, MPA '14
Apr 13, 2016
Elizabeth Martin, MPA '17
As an MPA student at the Woodrow Wilson School, I've been awed and advised by classmates, faculty, professors and alumni. My hope is that this new series of alumni profiles, “WooSights,” will give you a sense of the generosity and depth of the Wilson School community and offer some insights into how alumni have made the most of the opportunities it provides. -- Elizabeth Martin  Adam Kent, MPA ‘14 Program Officer, Local Initiatives Support...
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Apr 8, 2016
B. Rose Huber
This weekend SAOC will celebrate its 20th anniversary. In the mid-1990s, graduate students at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs recognized two critical needs among students of color: a space to discuss the challenges students of color might face as public service leaders and dedicated time to connect with those who’d gone before them—alumni who’d already carved out a path in the policy arena. Full Story Here.
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Apr 5, 2016
Vivian Chang, MPA '17
I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be. –Douglas Adams One year ago, I was in your shoes. I was on the edge of my seat, getting ready to run/drive/fly to Princeton and show them that I was even more amazing in person and a guaranteed investment, if they would admit me off the waitlist. Luckily for me, it worked. Unfortunately, not every story ends this way. This post is for you who is stuck...
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Apr 5, 2016
Public Affairs
A group of undergraduate and graduate students traveled to the coast of Normandy, France over spring break to explore the the D-Day Invasion of World War II. The trip was led by the Center for International Security Studies and organized by Travis Sharp, a Ph.D. student at WWS and director of the center's Student Education Initiative program. View Photos Here. All photos were taken by Katherine Elgin, a Ph.D. student at WWS.
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Apr 1, 2016
Public Affairs
Opening April 4, the show, “In the Nation’s Service? Woodrow Wilson Revisited,” documents not only the positive but also the negative aspects of Wilson’s tenure as 13th president of Princeton University and 28th president of the United States. Full Story.
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Mar 31, 2016
B. Rose Huber
“Over the years, I have seen these awards as personal matters, but the Wilson School asked me to finally share,” Reinhardt said. “I am proud and happy to receive these honors but also humbled by them. You always ask: why me?” Full Story.
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Mar 24, 2016
B. Rose Huber
In the mid-1990s, graduate students at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs recognized two critical needs among students of color: a space to discuss the challenges students of color might face as public service leaders and dedicated time to connect with those who’d gone before them—alumni who’d already carved out a path in the policy arena. Full Story.
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Mar 23, 2016
Public Affairs
Accessing potable water in rural Morocco was an ordeal that damaged public health and kept many girls too busy for school. With the implementation of targeted reforms, the percentage of rural Moroccans with some access to potable water has soared from 61 percent in 2004 to 94 percent today. The latest case study produced by Innovations for Successful Societies explores the reforms which have brought water to 12 million Moroccans, allowing young...
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Mar 17, 2016
WWS Graduate Admissions Office
Happy St. Paddy's Day from the WWS Graduate Admissions Office!
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Mar 15, 2016
B. Rose Huber
People in the workplace may adjust their behavior to break stereotypes about themselves or match the stereotypes of others -- even if it means playing dumb or giving the cold shoulder, a Princeton University study finds. Full Story.
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Mar 10, 2016
Public Affairs
Congratulations to the 2016 Liman Fellows! Full story here.
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Mar 8, 2016
Public Affairs
Nancy Duff Campbell, Kate Grant and Diane Coffey are just a few of the incredible women who have walked through the doors of Robertson Hall. Today, in honor of International Women's Day, we share with you some pieces featuring these women. Nancy Duff Campbell: A Path to Service WooCast Alumna Kate Grant Gives a Voice to the World's Poorest Women Maternal Health in India Much Worse than Previously Thought
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Mar 3, 2016
B. Rose Huber
Voters in 12 states solidified two front-runners in the presidential campaign: Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, who are both looking ahead to November. Full Story.
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Mar 1, 2016
Susan B. Higgins
Participants in last fall's graduate Policy Workshop, "Building Ties with Former Enemies," met with officials from the U.S. State Department and the National Security Council in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 18, 2015, to present recommendations designed to advance the normalization of U.S.-Cuba relations. Full Story.
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Feb 25, 2016
Lauren R. Mosko
Eileen Claussen, environmentalist and energy scholar, discusses her distinguished career. Full Story Here.
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Feb 23, 2016
Public Affairs
Princeton's Global Health Program (GHP) serves as a hub for students interested in tackling some of the most pressing health-related issues of our time. Full Story.
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Feb 19, 2016
Lauren R. Mosko
The Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs has selected three students as the 2015 and 2016 Richard H. Ullman Fellows. This fellowship allows recipients to engage in a one-year, career-defining practitioner experience in the field of international affairs. Full Story.
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Feb 17, 2016
Public Affairs
Interested in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs? Want to learn more about our school and the graduate programs we offer? Watch the below video to gain some insight into WWS! Click here for video.
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Feb 8, 2016
Susan B. Higgins
Thanks to the efforts of many generous, community-minded graduate students, faculty and staff at the Woodrow Wilson School (WWS), more than $11,000 was raised to benefit the Isles Youth Institute (IYI) in Trenton, N.J., at the Eighth Annual Woodrow Wilson Action Committee (WWAC) Service Auction held Dec. 11, 2015, at Robertson Hall. The WWAC is the graduate student government body of the Wilson School, created to provide students both a voice in...
Frank von Hippel
Feb 5, 2016
Jeanne Jackson DeVoe
The world’s nuclear enrichment programs should be under international control to prevent the development of nuclear weapons after the new arms deal with Iran expires in 10 to 15 years, said Frank von Hippel, a senior Princeton University research physicist and a former security advisor during the Clinton Administration. Full Story Here.
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Jake Shapiro
Feb 4, 2016
B. Rose Huber
Jacob Shapiro, associate professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton Universitys Woodrow Wilson School, has been named winner of the 2016 Karl Deutsch Award by the International Studies Association. Full Story.
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Jan 25, 2016
Public Affairs
The Woodrow Wilson School has many centers and programs, one being the Center for Information Technology. Here is their blog, Freedom To Tinker, that discusses digital technologies in public life. Visit Blog.
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Martin Gilens
Jan 21, 2016
B. Rose Huber
Today marks the sixth anniversary of the Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission decision. This decision stated that the First Amendment prohibited the government from restricting independent political expenditures by a nonprofit corporation. This has also been extended to include for-profit corporations, labor unions and other associations. On todays anniversary we look at Martin Gilens work on affluence and influence. Full Story.
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Jan 20, 2016
Public Affairs
WHO reports that the Ebola epidemic in West Africa that plagued that region for the last two years is nearing the end. Princeton examined this issue in-depth at a conference in Dublin: View Story Here.
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Jan 13, 2016
WWS Graduate Admissions
Application Processing Once you submit your application you may log in to the online portal to review your activity and to check the status of your supporting materials. We review each application and will notify you if we find that anything is missing; you do not have to contact us to ask if we have all of your materials. This process takes several weeks. The order in which your application is processed in the system has no bearing on your...
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Jan 11, 2016
Michael Hotchkiss
On the second floor of Lewis Thomas Lab at Princeton University, researchers are working to better understand the complex interactions between environmental conditions and human DNA. At the University of Michigan, researchers are using magnetic resonance imaging to study the brains of adolescents from disadvantaged backgrounds. And researchers at Stony Brook University are examining what affects sleep patterns among such teenagers. These...
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Jan 7, 2016
B. Rose Huber
Curbing school bullying has been a focal point for educators, administrators, policymakers and parents, but the answer may not lie within rules set by adults, according to new research led by Princeton University. Instead, the solution might actually be to have the students themselves, particularly those most connected to their peers, promote conflict resolution in school. Full Story.
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